Changes to the UCAT ANZ for 2022!

30 MAR 2022

If you’re sitting the UCAT ANZ this July, make sure you’re aware of the changes to the UCAT!

Ahead of the 2022 UCAT ANZ, Pearson has made a couple of changes to the content and structure of the exam.

For more information on the changes, get in touch with MedView today. Our team are here to help you prepare and succeed in this exam.

Changes to Quantitative Reasoning

In 2022, candidates will have one more minute to answer questions. This means on average candidates will have about 41.5 seconds to answer each Quantitative Reasoning question as opposed to 40 seconds previously.

There is no change to the number of questions in this section.
Students shouldn’t make changes to their timing strategy for this section, rather use this ‘extra time’ to go back and double-check their answers in this section.

Be mindful that this section has always been a high scoring section and the additional time may mean the questions are a little harder than in previous exams.

Changes to Abstract Reasoning

In 2022, this section will have 5 fewer questions, with one less minute to answer them. The change in the number of questions is proportional to the change in time, so the average time to answer a question still remains at 14 seconds per question.

The five questions removed from Abstract Reasoning are Set A / B / N unit questions, which is the most common type of question in this section.

In terms of preparing, this shouldn’t change a students approach or preparation strategy for this section.

Changes to Situational Judgement

Changes to the Situational Judgement section are the most significant change in this exam this year. Firstly, the number of questions has been reduced by 3. There is no change to the timing of this section which means overall students get on average one more second per question.

Secondly, there is a new type of question introduced to the exam, which will probably be more time consuming than others in this section.

This new type of question is a variation of the standard Situational Judgement questions. Instead of students having four answer options to Appropriateness and Importance questions, e.g.,

  • A very appropriate thing to do
  • Appropriate, but not ideal
  • Inappropriate, but not awful
  • A very appropriate thing to do

Now there will only be two answer options:

  • Appropriate
  • Not appropriate

There is also a change to the format of the new Situational Judgement questions. They will be presented in a ‘drag and drop’ format. So candidates will need to drag and drop their answer next to the response to decide if the statements are appropriate/not appropriate or important/not important.

Instead of having one statement per question and deciding if it is appropriate/not appropriate or important/not important, candidates will now have three statements per question.

Making this section a lot more time consuming than previously.

Students should prepare in advance and make sure they are comfortable and have adapted their preparation and timing strategy to accommodate this change.

In Summary

  • The overall length of the UCAT is still two hours long and hasn’t changed
  • Verbal Reasoning and Decision Making have not changed
  • Quantitative Reasoning is now one minute longer
  • The number of questions in Abstract Reasoning has decreased by 5 (from 55 to 50 questions)
  • Situational Judgement now has a new question type
  • The number of questions in Situational Judgement has decreased by 3 (from 69 to 66 questions)

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